RCPD Report 11/18/15

RCPD vehicles (better) 6-15
A New Hampshire man was taken into custody by Riley County Police Tuesday after being extradited from his home state on a probation warrant.  Ivan Beaulieu, 23, of Rollinsford, New Hampshire was arrested at approximately 8:47 AM at the Riley County Police Department after being extradited from New Hampshire.
The original warrant was related to Aggravated Arson, Felony Criminal Damage to Property, and theft. The Riley County District Court issued this as a no bond warrant.
KMAN’s records indicate Beaulieu was arrested about a year ago from an incident involving burned carpet and clothing that belonged to a roommate and apartment company. At the time of his arraignment in February of this year, it was indicated there were two incidents in November and one in September of last year that led to the charges against him.
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A sexual assault involving a minor that allegedly occurred in Manhattan was reported to Riley County Police Tuesday. The case is currently being investigated by detectives and due to the sensitive nature of the on-going investigation no further information is being released.
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A report of a vehicle theft was filed in the 1800 block of College Avenue in Manhattan Tuesday at about 7:00 AM.  Tiffany Scarborough, 19, of Manhattan reported her Maroon 2012 Chevy Cruise was stolen by a known associate.

The vehicle was later located and recovered by officers in the Wal-Mart parking lot in Manhattan. No arrests related to the theft have been made at the time of this report and the incident continues to be under investigation.

Wamego to allow chickens within city limits

Chickens will now be allowed within the city limits of Wamego.  At Tuesday’s City Commission meeting, City Manager Merl Page again introduced the ordinance allowing chickens.   This issue had been tabled at two earlier meetings, but was approved by a vote of 3 to 1 with Mayor Cliff Baughman opposed.  Commissioner Bill Ditto was absent. 

The ordinance restricts chickens to only single-family detached residences, and only four (4) hens (no roosters) will be allowed at each residence.  The ordinance restricts the slaughter of chickens outside, and they must be kept in a secure enclosure to be maintained and cleaned on a regular basis.  The enclosure must meet the construction requirements of both the City and Zoning codes.  Page said the ordinance will be published the newspaper allowing public comments. 

In other business, the Commission voted not to list two (2) electric utility units with the Southwest Power Pool, which manages energy within the pool.   Page said the KMEA (Kansas Municipal Energy Agency) said it doesn’t make sense to have these units registered in the marketplace at this time, because it’s more procedural, and doesn’t have much value at this time.

Wamego’s City staff and employees will benefit with lower health insurance rates for another year.  At Tuesday’s City Commission meeting, City Manager Merl Page said the benefits committee reviewed the proposal from Blue Cross/Blue Shield, increasing there next year’s insurance rates from 1 point 6 percent to 1 point 85 percent.   The City was very pleased with the rates quoted, and the Commission approved renewing with Blue Cross/Blue Shield for another year by a vote of 4 to 0.

In other business, the Board approved the Certificate of Appropriation from the Division of Water Resources, a department within the Department of Agriculture for the final allocation of the City’s Water Well #10.  According to Page, Well #10 was drilled in 1994 after the approval of all the applications to drill the well, and the Division of Water Resources has given final allocation of gallons per minute, and the annual aggregate that can be taken from the well.  They actually reduced the gallons per minute from 400 to 325.  Page said historically no more than 320 to 325 gallons per minute have been taken from the well. 

The City of Wamego is looking forward to a favorable bond rating.  At Tuesday’s City Commission meeting, City Manager Merl Page said he met with their financial advisor from Piper Jaffray  to review the City’s Electric Revenue Bond rating.  He said the City’s established a number of things that should put the City in a favorable position for an increase in the rating.  The City’s current bond rating is A-.

In other business, the board approved renewing the Wamego Health Center board appointment of Jamie Hubler and Dwight Faulkner for another five (5) years each after both expressed an interest in serving another term. 

Manhattan residents voice rezoning concerns to City Commissioners

 

City1

Parcel relocation had Manhattan City Commissioner’s talking last night, as they dove into the topic of rezoning.

Assistant Director of Planning, Eric Cattell spoke to commissioners as they considered the first reading of an ordinance that would rezone 142 parcels located east of City Park, from a Four-Family Residential District to a Single-Family Residential District.

The rezoning discussion comes as the city works to implement the recently adopted Manhattan Urban Area Comprehensive Plan update, that identifies several areas on the west and east sides of the K-State Campus as a priority for rezoning in an effort to address the need for a variety of housing types in the community.

The discussion was met with an outcry of disapproval from Manhattan residents, who voiced their concerns in a public comment session lasting nearly three hours.

In October, protest petitions were filed with the City Clerk’s office following the close of the Planning Board’s public hearing on the issue.

Following review, City administration determined that verifiable signatures represented only 16.73% of the area. In order for the petitions to have worked, they would have needed to represent a total of 20% of the area.

Closing the discussion, commissioner’s voted to approve the first reading of the ordinance – promising to investigate all options as the project moves forward.

From rezoning to releasing, commissioners turned their attention to the first reading of an ordinance that will see $1,700,000.00 in Industrial Revenue Bonds issued to GTM Sportswear.

Deputy City Manager, Jason Hilgers walked commissioner’s through the structure of the bond while providing background on its origins.

In May of 2006, the City Commission conducted a public hearing and passed a resolution of Intent to issue up to $28 million in industrial revenue bonds to finance the costs of acquiring, constructing, expanding and equipping GTM’s manufacturing facility on McCall Road.

City Manager Ron Fehr has stressed that the money does not come from the City and is only facilitated by it.

Of the $28 million dollars available to GTM, the City has issued IRB’s on only four occasion – totaling a release of nearly $12 million.

Commissioners approved the first reading of the ordinance to issue the funds, which GTM plans to use to construct a warehouse facility.

Setting their sights on projects further down in the pipeline, commissioners were on the hunt for projects to submit to K-State for consideration in their 2017 city/university special project request.

Assistant City Manager, Kiel Mangus guided commissioners through a presentation of projects up for submission.

Projects being considered include;

Click to view slideshow.
The City/University Special Projects Fund was created as a result of the annexation of Kansas State University in July of 1994, in an effort to fund projects of mutual benefit to the community and K-State.

The 2016 approved amount by the City Commission for the City/University Special Projects Fund totaled $629,283 and included five projects.

City business aside, the spotlight shifted toward local business – as Mayor Karen McCulloh proclaimed November 28th Small Business Saturday in Manhattan.

The city joins together with American Express and U.S. and local Chambers of Commerce to support locally owned businesses in America.

Participating local businesses can be found by visiting the American Express Small Business Saturday website.

For more from the Manhattan City Commission and news spanning Riley County and surrounding areas – Follow Austin on Twitter @ABarnesKMAN

RCPD Report 11/17/15

Handcuffs and Key
A Manhattan man was taken into custody by Riley County Police Monday afternoon on a bond forfeiture warrant. Donnie Hill, 42, was arrested at approximately 3:57 PM while in the 100 block of Courthouse Plaza in Manhattan.
The original warrant was related to Possession of Marijuana with Intent to Distribute. Bond was listed as $7,500.
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A 21-year-old Ogden man faces a probation violation warrant following his arrest Monday morning. Travis Rock was taken into custody at about 11:13 while in the 100 block of North 4th Street in Manhattan.
Bond was listed as $5,000.
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Riley County Police responded to a report of a domestic related incident in the 100 block of 8th Street in Ogden Monday a little before 11 a.m.. Investigation revealed multiple damaged items and at one point one of the persons involved apparently attempted to light a small fire.
23 year old Tanasha Dupree, 23, of Ogden was placed under arrest for Attempted Aggravated Arson and Theft. Bond was listed as $5,000.

Dartez trial underway, stabbing weapon described

Photo by Cathy Dawes

Photo by Cathy Dawes

A Manhattan man charged with attempted first degree murder sat through the second day of his jury trial Tuesday morning in the Riley County District Courthouse room of Judge David Stutzman.

Samuel Dartez, 31, allegedly stabbed a 27-year-old woman multiple times on Nov. 13, 2014, near the intersection of Juliette and Yuma streets.

An earlier preliminary hearing heard from an eye witness who saw the altercation and called 911.

Dartez fled and was arrested in Morris County after a stand-off with police.

Riley County Police Department Crime Scene Investigator Allen Riniker took the stand Tuesday morning and identified clothing obtained from Dartez on the day of the incident and pointed out to the jury various suspected blood spots.

Riley County Attorney Barry Wilkerson then asked Riniker about the weapon allegedly used.

“A fillet knife,” Riniker described.

That knife, hasn’t been found though.

Riniker said a knife sheath has been found, but no blade has been discovered at the crime scene or where Dartez was arrested.

The trial is listed to last three more days and KMAN will be keeping tabs on the trial throughout the week.

JCPD reports scam

jcpd
In the last 24 hours, the Junction City Police Department has received information that two local businesses have been contacted by unknown persons, who advised they represented the City of Junction City and that the business had an outstanding balance on their water account.
The unknown caller then attempted to get the victim businesses to pay those outstanding balances by wiring money to satisfy the unpaid amount. These calls are a scam and no representative from the City of Junction City would attempt to have a customer submit payment by wire for an outstanding water bill.
Anyone getting one of these calls should gather all information they possibly can from the caller such as caller ID and call the Junction City Police immediately at 762-5912.

Wamego man dies in crash

mark-bettencourt

A Wamego optometrist has died in a one vehicle roll-over crash in Cayman Brac. Dr. Mark Bettencourt, 54, had been visiting since Friday but was not found right away. His body was later found underneath the vehicle.

The crash also killed Topeka construction company owner Douglas Carney, 50 and critically injured longtime Cayman Brac resident Robert “Bob” Barbera, 48.

Authorities indicate the Honda Odyssey van ran off the road at about 5:15 p.m. Sunday although Betencourt’s body wasn’t found until 8:45. It wasn’ t known until later that Bettencourt had been with the other two.

Bettencourt had been an optometrist in Wamego since 1994. He is survived by a wife, three daughters, and a son.

Council on Aging asks commissioners to reconsider funding cuts

Riley County Commissioners Ron Wells, left, Robert Boyd and Ben Wilson.

Riley County Commissioners Ron Wells, left, Robert Boyd and Ben Wilson.

When Riley County commissioners approved the budget in August, they knew it would leave plenty of people frustrated.

One of the more frustrated voices came from the Riley County Council on Aging.

Mary Jo Harbour, the chairwoman for the council, told commissioners their funding is $5,000 what it was in 2011 and that it’s been a struggle this year.

“Please, give serious consideration to restoring funds that you took from us,” she pleaded Monday morning in the Commission Chambers.

This summer, the county reduced its appropriation to the council to its lowest amount since 2011 and other programs suffered the same.

County commissioners contended then — as they do now — that the funding cuts at the state level have had adverse effects on the local level and that funding that normally would go to services such as the Riley County Council on Aging have went to prop up basic county operations.

Commission Chairman Ron Wells was sympathetic to the council’s plight, but cautioned that things could get worse before they get better, especially with the property tax lid initiative from Topeka that was slipped into the state budget bill that regulates what local governments can spend by requiring special elections on property tax increases if they exceed rates of inflation.

Of course, the language on the property tax lid sets up an impossible time-frame to even hold those elections, considering property valuations aren’t known till later in the summer, anyway, and because of that, likely won’t be known in time to get a property tax question ready for a November ballot.

So who knows how that will work out.

“We’re very aware of what’s coming down the pike on this lid, which is going to hurt you… it’s going to hurt all of us,” Wells said. “We encourage the senior citizens who vote to be sure to be aware of that. Talk to the legislators. Keep the pressure on.”

RILEY COUNTY COUNCIL ON AGING APPROPRIATIONS SINCE 2011:

2011: $234,387

2012: $242,880

2013: $242,880

2014: $252,382

2015: $252,437

2016: $255,287 (asked for), $229,758 (received)

Wells told Harbour that he and fellow commissioner Robert Boyd have discussed restoring the council’s full funding and will if the budget allows, but again cautioned much of that is dependent on what happens at the state level.

Harbour said a solution that Commissioner Ben Wilson — who was absent Monday — brought up over the summer hasn’t been working.

“I would also point out that despite one of the commissioner’s — and unfortunately he’s not here today – effort to convince everybody that the churches can do all of this… they can not,” she said.

While Wells said he believes churches and other organizations picking up the slack would be ideal, he conceded that it’s not the solution.

Harbour said it’s a tough time for organizations trying to help senior citizens. The Riley County Council on Aging helps provide meals for them and Harbour added that these services help those who have little assistance from others — even their families.

“It’s very hard when your family doesn’t live here,” she said. “And a lot of the people I see at the senior center, they have no one that is the area that can help.

“Some of us try to help, but we’re all getting older, too. So, it’s getting hard.”

In other items, commissioners appointed Linda Morse to the North Central-Flint Hills Area Agency on Aging Advisory Board and signed a thank you letter to Michael Cates for serving on the Riley County Public Health Council.

Also, outgoing Riley County Health Department Director Brenda Nickel announced that Lisa Ross, the department’s WIC (Women, Infants and Children) coordinator, will serve as interim director till a replacement is found.

Nickel’s last day will be on Dec. 11.

Finally,  Riley County Treasurer Shilo Heger told commissioners that 2015 tax statements were mailed out Nov. 10.

Heger said that if a tax statement is not received by Nov. 20, her office should be called and another statement will be mailed.

First half taxes are due Dec. 21 and second half taxes are due on May 10, 2016.

Council on Aging asks commissioners to reconsider funding cuts

Riley County Commissioners Ron Wells, left, Robert Boyd and Ben Wilson.

Riley County Commissioners Ron Wells, left, Robert Boyd and Ben Wilson.

When Riley County commissioners approved the budget in August, they knew it would leave plenty of people frustrated.

One of the more frustrated voices came from the Riley County Council on Aging.

Mary Jo Harbour, the chairwoman for the council, told commissioners their funding is $5,000 what it was in 2011 and that it’s been a struggle this year.

“Please, give serious consideration to restoring funds that you took from us,” she pleaded Monday morning in the Commission Chambers.

This summer, the county reduced its appropriation to the council to its lowest amount since 2011 and other programs suffered the same.

County commissioners contended then — as they do now — that the funding cuts at the state level have had adverse effects on the local level and that funding that normally would go to services such as the Riley County Council on Aging have went to prop up basic county operations.

Commission Chairman Ron Wells was sympathetic to the council’s plight, but cautioned that things could get worse before they get better, especially with the property tax lid initiative from Topeka that was slipped into the state budget bill that regulates what local governments can spend by requiring special elections on property tax increases if they exceed rates of inflation.

Of course, the language on the property tax lid sets up an impossible time-frame to even hold those elections, considering property valuations aren’t known till later in the summer, anyway, and because of that, likely won’t be known in time to get a property tax question ready for a November ballot.

So who knows how that will work out.

“We’re very aware of what’s coming down the pike on this lid, which is going to hurt you… it’s going to hurt all of us,” Wells said. “We encourage the senior citizens who vote to be sure to be aware of that. Talk to the legislators. Keep the pressure on.”

RILEY COUNTY COUNCIL ON AGING APPROPRIATIONS SINCE 2011:

2011: $234,387

2012: $242,880

2013: $242,880

2014: $252,382

2015: $252,437

2016: $255,287 (asked for), $229,758 (received)

Wells told Harbour that he and fellow commissioner Robert Boyd have discussed restoring the council’s full funding and will if the budget allows, but again cautioned much of that is dependent on what happens at the state level.

Harbour said a solution that Commissioner Ben Wilson — who was absent Monday — brought up over the summer hasn’t been working.

“I would also point out that despite one of the commissioner’s — and unfortunately he’s not here today – effort to convince everybody that the churches can do all of this… they can not,” she said.

While Wells said he believes churches and other organizations picking up the slack would be ideal, he conceded that it’s not the solution.

Harbour said it’s a tough time for organizations trying to help senior citizens. The Riley County Council on Aging helps provide meals for them and Harbour added that these services help those who have little assistance from others — even their families.

“It’s very hard when your family doesn’t live here,” she said. “And a lot of the people I see at the senior center, they have no one that is the area that can help.

“Some of us try to help, but we’re all getting older, too. So, it’s getting hard.”

In other items, commissioners appointed Linda Morse to the North Central-Flint Hills Area Agency on Aging Advisory Board and signed a thank you letter to Michael Cates for serving on the Riley County Public Health Council.

Also, outgoing Riley County Health Department Director Brenda Nickel announced that Lisa Ross, the department’s WIC (Women, Infants and Children) coordinator, will serve as interim director till a replacement is found.

Nickel’s last day will be on Dec. 11.

Finally,  Riley County Treasurer Shilo Heger told commissioners that 2015 tax statements were mailed out Nov. 10.

Heger said that if a tax statement is not received by Nov. 20, her office should be called and another statement will be mailed.

First half taxes are due Dec. 21 and second half taxes are due on May 10, 2016.

RCPD to become part of Joint Terrorism Task Force

Photos by Cathy Dawes

Photos by Cathy Dawes

Pat Brodersen addressing Law Board

Pat Brodersen addressing Law Board

Terrorism fears are heightened around the world–and now Riley County Police apparently will have a voice on an FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force out of Kansas City, with the five members of the County’s Law Enforcement Agency Law Board giving their consensus to proceeding with adding a member to the group. The position is actually a full time one and would be selected from the RCPD ranks, to report back periodically to higher-ups at RCPD.

Riley County Police Director Brad Schoen briefed Board members about adding a person to the group. While RCPD was approached some time ago, now seems to be a good time to take part according to Schoen with N-BAF and the incident involving a bomb threat at Fort Riley this past spring as reasons. Schoen was referring to the arrest of  John T. Booker Jr., 21, of Topeka who was arrested in April while trying to arm what he thought was a 1,000-pound bomb inside a van near Fort Riley.

The Police Director told the board about the ups and downs of being part of the task force, with the upside being in the loop on situations of concern, but the downside being a person short.  But he says it’s worth being a person short and “biting the bullet.”

 

Board member Craig Beardsley, who also is the Program Administrator for the National Agricultural Biosecurity Center at Kansas State University, spoke in support of joining the group. And while board members seemed supportive, they had questions about more work on the final agreement before signing it.

RCPD Assistant Director John Doehling cautioned it will take possibly up to a year to obtain the top secret clearance required…

Board Chair Robert Boyd indicated he was very supportive but that he would like a more formal process as to where the board fits in before giving final approval. The group though gave RCPD officials the go-ahead to proceed, with hopes to have a more definitive agreement by their next meeting in December.
Parking concerns were brought before the board Monday, from Pat Brodersen with the Holiday Inn At The Campus in Manhattan. Brodersen told the group he sees at least a hundred a day trying to park in his lot rather than the parking garage across the street near the K-State Student Union. And he’s frustrated because wreckers won’t tow unless specified on tickets issued by Riley County Police. Brodersen adds he has some repeat offenders he’s particularly frustrated with.

Director Schoen explained the bottom line is who pays if someone is mistakenly towed but Brodersen seemed willing to take on that responsibility.

Board member Karen McCulloh, who also is Manhattan Mayor, indicated she’d check into city ordinances on the matter–and Board Chair Robert Boyd assured Brodersen they’d take the matter under advisement.